Home Mercantile Equestrian Books Philosophical A Horse’s Thought (Paperback) by Tom Moates

A Horse’s Thought (Paperback) by Tom Moates

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Product Description

Journey into Honest Horsemanship Series: Part 1

A Horse’s Thought, A Journey into Honest Horsemanship, is an extremely rare written glimpse into implementing the teachings of renowned clinician, Harry Whitney. Tom Moates’s popular writings exploring his personal exploits with Niji, Sokeri, and other horses, as he sincerely attempts to improve his horsemanship skills with Whitney’s patient guidance, are regular features in Eclectic Horseman and America’s Horse magazines. This book combines an abundance of new, previously unpublished material regarding this ongoing odyssey, with recently expanded and updated essays from the magazine series.

Inquisitive as always, Moates applies his familiar candid and plainspoken style to probe the depths of very difficult aspects of horsemanship. The results are sometimes wrecks, occasionally triumphs, but always enlightening…and a lot safer experienced on the page!

Paperback, black and white photographs, 124 pages.

About the Author

Tom Moates is a leading international equestrian journalist and author. This award winning writer is on the mastheads of Equus and Horse Connection magazines as a Contributing Writer, where his work frequently appears. Articles he pens run in many major horse magazines in the United States and abroad including The American Quarter Horse Journal, Eclectic-Horseman, I. M. Cowgirl, British Horse, America’s Horse, Paint Horse Journal, Western Horseman, and Hoofbeats (Australia). Discovering Natural Horsemanship, his first book, is firmly established as a staple of modern equestrian literature. He lives on a solar powered farm with his wife Carol and a herd of horses in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia.

An Excerpt from the Book
“Pitiful!” Harry said to me. “Just pitiful!”

Such encouragement from a teacher, let me tell you! Of course, I laughed–but only because it was true….

I maintained a grip on the lead rope, but only after taking many vigorous yanks Niji inflicted upon me. Again, with another fantastic example, Niji helps us to better understand with-you-ness by showing complete and utter not-with-me-ness. I went to get big with him once he blew past the initial spazz out. I simply seemed unable to get his attention. In fact, and a little embarrassing, I cracked my left knee attempting to get big enough to be of any consequence to the gelding at this point, and limped over to Harry. So this is where the clinician entered the picture, took the lead rope, and said, “Pitiful! Just pitiful!”

Harry got big, and wasted no time capturing and maintaining Niji’s attention. As said in a previous chapter, without the horse’s attention, you got no horse. So that needs to be in place before anything like with-you-ness can form. Before long, I sat on the sidelines watching a changed Niji carefully watching Harry.